Course Descriptions

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ANTH-100

Introduction to Anthropology

Credit(s): 3

This course provides a basic understanding of the four sub-fields of anthropology: biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and sociocultural anthropology. The course introduces foundational concepts, theories, and methods used by anthropologists to examine human cultural and biological variation through time and space. Emphasis is placed upon how the science of anthropology can be applied to help understand and solve contemporary problems.

ANTH-101

Introduction to Physical Anthropology

Credit(s): 3

This course offers instruction in how the human species has developed over the past five million years. Information includes the African fossil finds, possible ancestors of the first humans, how human populations may differ from each other biologically, and the development of human abilities to live in all of Earth's environments. Lecture: 3 hours per week

ANTH-102

Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology

Credit(s): 3

This course is a study of human culture, which involves the information and techniques people use to survive and get along with each other. Included are examples from exotic peoples around the world in the areas of religion, magic, kinship, coming of age ceremonies, marriage rituals, economic activities, hunting techniques, etc. The course includes a broad understanding of how human beings live and how human customs vary throughout the world. Lecture: 3 hours per week

ANTH-220

Peoples of the World

Credit(s): 3

This course provides a detailed overview of cultural anthropology. The course examines foundational concepts, methods, and theories used by anthropologists to examine the diversity of cultural practices and beliefs that exist throughout the world. Topics include: language, kinship, religion, magic, witchcraft, political systems, gender, and inequality among others. Emphasis is placed upon the comparative study of indigenous communities and how the science of cultural anthropology can be applied to help understand and solve contemporary problems. Lecture: 3 hours per week

ANTH-225

Native People of North America

Credit(s): 3

This course provides a general overview of North American Indian cultures. The course includes foundational concepts and methods used by anthropologists to better understand the diversity of indigenous beliefs and practices historically and today. This includes the examination of language, religion, subsistence, political systems, kinship, political systems, and contemporary issues among others. Emphasis is placed upon understanding and solving contemporary issues. Lecture: 3 hours per week

ANTH-230

Introduction to Archaeology and World Prehistory

Credit(s): 3

This course provides a detailed overview of world prehistory through archaeology. The course introduces foundational concepts, methods, and theories used by archaeologists to examine human biological and cultural diversity in prehistory. This includes the examination of the origin of humans, evidence of first stone tools, artifact analysis, dating techniques, origins of agriculture, and the rise of early states. Emphasis is placed upon how knowledge gained from past human experiences can help us to understand and solve contemporary problems. Seminar: 3 hours per week

ANTH-251

Introduction to Biological Anthropology

Credit(s): 3

This course provides a detailed overview of biological anthropology. The course comprises foundational concepts, methods, and theories used by anthropologists to better understand human biological diversity across time and space. This includes the examination of evolutionary theory, genetics, comparative anatomy, primate studies, and key archaeological finds to evaluate where, when, how, and why humans have evolved to be the organisms that we are today. Emphasis is placed upon how the science of biological anthropology can be applied to help understand and solve contemporary problems. Lecture: 3 hours per week