Course Descriptions

:  


INTR-200

Interdisciplinary Seminar

Credit(s): 3

This course integrates a range of disciplines, including social sciences, the arts, history, literature, philosophy, and natural sciences, to explore issues related to community, sustainability and/or humanity's role in maintaining public and environmental health in the 21st century. Utilizing experiential learning, writing across the curriculum, reading, research, and special projects, students use problem-solving skills to explore these issues. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Corequisites: ENGL-101 or have the appropriate test scores: COMPASS Writing >94, ACT English >25, SAT Verbal >570

INTR-250

Integrative Inquiry

Credit(s): 3

This course develops student's ability to collaboratively inquire using at least two disciplinary perspectives or frames of reference on a chosen theme, issue, problem or concept to complete a learning product, project, or presentation. As part of the course, students will develop their capacity to critically reflect on their learning process and how values, ethical considerations and non-cognitive factors shape their learning. The specific content for this course will vary depending on the term.

INTR-250A

Death and Dying: a Sociocultural, Historical, and Biological Perspective

Credit(s): 3

This course explores the social, cultural, historical, and biological nature of human death and dying through the application of social scientific research methods. Topics include: decomposition, death rituals, cultural construction of death, mourning and bereavement, end of life issues, and the ethical implications of death and dying. Students will examine the variety of socio-cultural responses, historically and today, to the biological fact of death. In the process, students will be exposed to a diverse array of disciplines and apply knowledge gained to develop a community based research project. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)

INTR-250B

Physical and Virtual Environments

Credit(s): 3

This course explores the ways humans live in, experience, process and record the physical environments in which they dwell. Through the lens of literature and philosophy, students will discover different ways that writers and thinkers have experienced their environments and recorded those experiences, along the way engaging in inquiry about how the digital age is shifting humans' sense of physical belonging-in-place. How has our cultural shift to the virtual (through video games, cell phones, social media, e-mail, etc.) changed our perceptions of what it means to be in the world? This is the central question that the class will explore. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)

INTR-250C

Integrative Business and Value Creation

Credit(s): 3

This course explores how organization and individuals turn resources and opportunity into value. It examines the functions and activities of business in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on the terminology necessary to understanding business principles and practices. The course also includes an exploration of business environments, human resources, management, marketing management, finance, management information tools, and international marketing. Focus is on critical factors essential to understanding the interdependence between different facets of business operations. This course is useful for those non-business majors who need an overview of what the study of business encompasses. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)
Recommended: MATH-108

INTR-250D

Juvenile Justice

Credit(s): 3

This course introduces students to the social issues related to juvenile justice by applying a philosophical and sociological lenses. The course reviews the central reasons for society's treatment and understanding of juvenile offenders. The philosophical roots of belief systems regarding practices and treatment of juvenile offenders will be explored by completing a historical analysis of juvenile law and punishment. Philosophical and sociological theoretical models are applied to understand the causes of criminal behavior by examining the social factors that influence and shape belief systems and behaviors. Finally, the course concludes by examining theories for prevention of juvenile crime by understanding the interdependent role between juvenile justice systems and society, which will be demonstrated through a learning product, project, or presentation. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)
Recommended: PHIL-103 or SOC-101

INTR-250E

Writing in the Wild: Literature and Language of Natural Spaces

Credit(s): 3

This course explores various frameworks writers have used to contemplate and respond to natural spaces. Students will be encouraged to situate themselves as individuals and as a community within these frameworks and to create their own texts in response to the natural spaces around them both independently and collaboratively. Using the lenses of literature, ethics, and political discourse, students will encounter different ways of seeing natural spaces, and then will venture into nature to draft their own individual and collaborative creative texts in response to what they see while looking through these same lenses. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)

INTR-250F

Integrative Inquiry: the Art of Presence

Credit(s): 3

This course is designed to develop reflective intrapersonal communication via the praxis of mindfulness, creativity, and reflection by grounding experiences through the integration of communication, psychology, and art. In this course, students will employ diverse forms of art as a means to develop self-awareness and mindful presence and to experience an authentic encounter between self and other via a process that requires self-knowledge and self-acceptance. Creativity is one of the ways that the self can learn to become more present, as the act of creation requires the full attention of the self, immersed fully within the present moment. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (100 level or higher)

INTR-250G

Teaching and Learning in the Outdoors

Credit(s): 3

This course explores how humans' interests, attitudes, beliefs and skills are developed outside the walls of a schoolroom. Topics include: experiential learning, teaching, lesson design, assessment, quality assurance, safety, patterns of learning and development, standards, and ethical considerations for experiential education. The key question students will investigate: How do people teach and learn outside of the traditional classroom? In the process of active inquiry, students will be exposed to a diverse array of disciplines and apply knowledge gained to collaboratively design and implement a developmentally appropriate and challenging outdoor learning experience for others. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)

INTR-250H

Manufacturing Desire: Persuasive Marketing and Message Creation

Credit(s): 3

This course course provides students with copywriting, advertising campaign planning and messaging strategies in various circumstances as one would experience in a typical advertising agency or client-side marketing team. Through the lenses of business marketing and English composition rhetoric, students will create for themselves a professional portfolio which showcases their copywriting abilities for web, print, broadcast, direct mail, sponsorship, and other advertising platforms (this portfolio is typically required by potential employers for students pursuing copywriting careers at agencies and in-house marketing positions). Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)

INTR-250I

Page to Stage: Making Theatre From Scratch

Credit(s): 3

This course follows the creation of a theatrical production from the writing of a short play all the way to its production in front of an audience. Techniques and skills in writing, design, acting/performance, and technical theatre will be explored and developed. Students should be prepared for meeting outside of regular class meetings. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)

INTR-250J

Psychology of Marketing

Credit(s): 3

This course is designed to investigate how social and behavioral science informs and impacts business and marketing fields. Psychology of Marketing will integrate sociological perspectives, analyze and evaluate consumer behavior from a psychological framework, and then address, from the perspective of both distribution and consumption, the strategies that are implemented by companies and organizations. The course culminates in a learning product, project, or presentation that connects these multiple ways of knowing to the intricacies of marketing and consumer behavior. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)

INTR-250K

Art and Social Justice

Credit(s): 3

This course explores the intersection of social justice and the arts. Through the lens of sociology, literature, and fine arts, students will examine theories of social justice, analyze a range of literary and artistic texts, explore the ways in which artistic expression interacts with social movements, and apply their knowledge in a collaborative culminating project. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)

INTR-250L

Artistic Expression in the 20th Century

Credit(s): 3

This course explores changes in the arts occurring in the early 20th Century that freed visual artists, writers, and musical composers to express new ideas in innovative and abstract ways. Reviewing 19th Century developments in technology, such as the camera, telegraph, and phonograph, along with the ideas of influential thinkers of the time, sets the stage for studying artistic, literary, and musical works of such people as Pablo Picasso, T.S. Eliot, and Igor Stravinsky. Students will respond aesthetically to and will make connections among visual art, literature, and music through individual and cooperative assignments that include options for artistic expression. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)

INTR-250M

Eastern Europe: Society Through Film

Credit(s): 3

This course explores the politics and social history of Eastern Europe through the analysis of motion picture media. Drawing upon social science context and research methods, various topics will be presented as they correspond with issues presented by key Eastern European films. Such topics include: foreign occupation, Sovietization, political economy, political movements, regime change, cultural and religious identity, separatism, civil wars and contemporary political institutions. Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)
Recommended: ENGL-102

INTR-250N

Mathematics and Aesthetics of Musical Tuning

Credit(s): 3

This course will track the development of musical tuning from the ancient world through the advent of equal temperament. Students will examine the philosophical and aesthetic implication of these changes in terms of musical performance, our mathematical understanding of the world, and our world view in general. What is elegant? What is consonant? What is ugly? What is dissonant, chaotic, or asymmetric? Lecture: 3 hours per week
Prerequisites: 30 credits (level 100 of higher)
Recommended: College-level Math or Physics course

INTR-290

Internship

Credit(s): 1

This course is an off-campus experience designed to give students the opportunity to apply their chosen areas of interdisciplinary study to specific community-related or employment-related situations. Internships are overseen by a faculty member either in the interdisciplinary studies program or in one of the student's main areas of study. Eight credits maximum can be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor